Radio Station Of Polish Anti

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    Polish Anti-Nicotine Tango: Nikotyna - Albert Harris, 1930

    Polish Anti-Nicotine Tango: Nikotyna - Albert Harris, 1930

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    Albert Harris - Zawsze będzie czegoś ci brak, 1939

    Zawsze będzie czegoś ci brak (You'll Always Miss It) -- (Valse-boston, J.Markowski/ W.Stępień) -- Albert Harris & Orkiestra tan. „Odeon" dyr. Jerzy Gert, Odeon 1939 --------------------------------------------------------- This song was composed by Jan Markowski in 1938 and recorded in January 1939, immediately becoming a great hit and -- soon -- one of Polish evergreens. The nostalgic title in September 1939 became almost a prophecy for the Poles, when their capital and many other cities lay in ruins under the Nazi bombs, the half of the nation was emigrating, or dead, or still fighting on the collapsing fronts of the country invaded from West by the Wehrmacht and from East by the Red Army, and the old prewar Poland was never to come back. ----------------------------------- To know more about Jerzy Gert and Albert Harris -- see

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    MORFINA - Tango, Adam Aston 1936 - Witkacys paintings !

    Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz, a.k.a. "Witkacy" (February 24, 1885 September 18, 1939) was a Polish playwright, novelist, painter, photographer and philosopher, more: During the 1930's, Witkiewicz published a text on his experiences with "narcotics," including peyote; his paintings are often full of descriptions what mixture and kind of drugs he was applying himself before starting to paint. Shortly after Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany in September 1939, he escaped with his young lover to Eastern Poland. Following the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, 1939, Witkacy committed suicide. In his home country Poland, a week ago, an anniversary of 70 years from his tragic death was celebrated. Tango "Morfina" is probably of Italian origin (?). Record, its label is presented at the end of the video - JP's, author's of the video collection. Sound transferred without any modification or trials of making it "polished & beautiful". Pictures - found and collected on-line with hope of their being in a public domain. Witkacy's autoportrait is finishing the slide of his paintings.

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    Polish Tango: Faliszewski Twe usta kłamią, 1933

    Tadeusz Faliszewski - Twe usta kłamią (Your Lips Are Lying) (Kataszek /Włast) Tango z teatru "Rex", Syrena-Electro 1933 NOTE: Szymon KATASZEK (né Boruch Szymon Kataszek) composer, pianist, bandleader, one of pioneers of Polish jazz. Born in Warsaw 1898; executed by the nazis in Warsaw, 1943. He received his musical education in the Music Institute in Warsaw (the class of piano) and in St. Cecilia Academy in Rome. Having returned to Poland before completing his studies, he got his first job as an organist in St.Trinity Church in Warsaw, working also in the nightclubs as a pianist. He also played for some time in the Military Band of the Garrison of Warsaw. In 1920 he enlisted as a soldier to the Polish Army to fight in the Polish-Bolshevic War. In 1921 he went to Gdańsk and Berlin, to play in dance orchestras. From the end of 1922, back in Warsaw, he and his friend Zygmunt Karasiński - who also had some experience having played with the German dance bands - established a jazz quintett, that appeared on the stage of a newly opened & fashionable restaurant „Oaza". Their performances became a sensation. In 1924 the Krasiński & Kataszek Band recorded its first sides for „Syrena" and until 1928 they toured many times around Poland, performing at the most elegant hotels, restaurants and holiday spas. In his memoirs, the fiddler Aleksander Halicki - one of musicians who played in Krasiński & Kataszek Band, wrote, they were the first professional Polish dance orchestra that applied the instrumental improvisation. Kataszek's activity was not merely bandleading: he also composed dozens of first Polish foxtrotts, black-bottoms, shimmies, charlestons. His hits (called in pre-war Poland „schlagers") were presented on the stages of little theatres of Warsaw: „Qui Pro Quo", „Perskie Oko", „Rex", and sung by the whole of Poland: „A ile mi dasz?" (How Much Shall I Get From You?), „To Zula (W futerko się otula)" (Its Zula, Who Wraps Herself In The Fur - dedicated to the charleston-dance pionieer and a „Qui Pro Quo" singer, Zula Pogorzelska), „Abram, ja ci zagram!" (Ill Play It For You, Abram!) or a tango „Czemuś o mnie zapomniał?" (Wy Have You Forgotten Me?) rewarded the Grand Prix of 1932 Tango Competition, organized by the theatre „Morskie Oko" together with Syrena-Electro Co. In 1933 he and Krasiński wrote music for the film comedy „Każdemu wolno kochać" with two schlagers: the rumba „Chcesz to mnie bierz" (Take Me, If You Feel Like It) and the homonymous tango „Każdemu wolno kochać" (Everybody Has A Right To Love). A nice anecdote is linked with this song: when in 1935 Polish Parliament confirmed the new constitution for the Polish Republic with full rights granted to the homosexuals, from the age of 15 (it was one of few such tolerant law regulations in the world) tango „Każdemu wolno kochać" became an unofficial anthem of the gay circles in Poland and in form of a comment to the new constistution - performed by the male vocal/dance duett - it was sung in the cabarets. Taking profit from his enormous popularity, Kataszek also maintained a social activity. He was a chairman of the Society For Workless Musicians, that forced a rule obliging all artistic unions in Poland of writing 20% off their radio performance incomes for the benefit of the jobless musicians. In 1938 he arranged the enormous Festival Of Dance with 10 best dance orchestras of Poland, performing for the public in Karowa Street in Warsaw. The whole income was conveyed to the National Fund Of The Aircraft Building. Alas, a year later, no aircratf was able to rescue Poland from the murderous attack on her, from the both sides: nazi Germany from the west, and 2 weeks later, the Soviet Union from the East. As most of the artists, Kataszek left Warsaw for Lwow, and he got under the Soviet occupation. In the very beginning he was allowed to perform for the Soviet dignitaries in the night restaurant „Imperial". But when in June 1941 the Soviet-German war blew out, he, instead of fleeing farther eastwards, returned to Warsaw. Many Polish patriotic Jews, who hated communists the same much, as Poles, did so, unaware of horrors carried on in the nazi-occupied Poland. That's how he got to the Warsaw Ghetto. In first few months he managed to carry on with bandleading: he led the Ghetto Jewish Police Orchestra, but when the first deportations to Treblinka and Bełżec started, he managed to slide out to the „aryan" side and he went to Lwow. There - as the unverified sources say - he returned to his „Imperial", where he led the band again. But, recognised by one of the guests, who was the SS officer from Warsaw - he was arrested and sent to the prison of Pawiak in the Warsaw Ghetto. And there - its a version confirmed by the historians - he was shot with a group of prisoners, on 22 May, 1943.

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    Commercial foxtrot from Warsaw - Morwitan, 1930

    Albert Harris & Orkiestra taneczna „Odeon" dir. By Jerzy Gert Morwitan, Foxtrot (Hen-wy/ Ted-rey) Odeon, ca 1930 NOTE: Here is another commercial song sponsored by „Morwitan" - major cigarette tubes producer in pre-war Poland. This song hasn't any anti-nicotine bias in its text. It is purely commercial and even - it enhances smoking as utterly innocent and pleasure providing occupation. So, when the side A of this record (which is the anti-nicotine tango "Nikotyna") tells a tragic story of a boy, completely possessed by a killer girl Nikotyna, on side B we find a total withdrawal from this idea. „Nothing smokes so well as Morwitan/ it is available in every little store/ it will soothe you to dreams better than hashish or opium/ so go and buy Morwitan!" - sings Harris, to end his canto with the exclamation coda, in a very last second of the side: „Nothing, but Morwitan!" Seeing this, both authors: of the music as well as the lyricist preferred to hide their names under carefully encrypted pseudonyms. Oh, that brutal early free-market capitalism! The slideshow presents some of pre-war Polish posters. See also the Polish anti-nicotine tango "Nikotyna" :

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    Tadeusz Faliszewski - Ty i moja gitara , 1931

    Tadeusz Faliszewski, artysta teatru "Morskie Oko" (The Artist from "Morskie Oko" theatre) - Ty i moja gitara (You And My Guitar), Tango z rewii "Hallo! Ameryka!" (Tango from the revue "Hallo, America!") Muz.: Jerzy Petersburski/ Tekst: Andrzej Włast, Syrena-Electro 1931 --------------------------------------------------- In his memoirs, Ludwik Sempoliński - one of the most popular comic singers and actors in prewar Warsaw - writes about this premiere, that Andrzej Włast, director of the grandeur revue theatre "Morskie Oko" - who in 1920/30s remained in constant conflict & competition with another histerically popular Warsaw cabaret "Qui Pro Quo" - the smaller, yet more "intellectual" scene - decided - after suggestions of his maitre de danse Antoni Nelle (who just returned from the USA) - to arrange (in spite of the Depression) a great "American" show in Warsaw, entitled "Hello! America". They created a kind of a "girls! girls! girls!" show, that would never be (technically) possible on the small stage of "Qui pro Quo". Włast went as far as to import from New York an American actress Margarethe Donaldson. The stage was whole wrapped in white and black silk weils and courtains, the orchestra was dressed in white tuxedos, the art deco desing made the stage a shop window of the newest worldly trends in decorating. Yet, after 40 performances, the title was closed down. The reason was, among others, Tadeusz Faliszewski, who was employed for this show as master of ceremony, as well as he had to sing a lot of songs (including Jerzy Petersburski's tango "Ty i moja gitara"). This difficult actor/singer task was beyond possibilities of that not smashingly handsome tenor, completely deprived of vis comica, who was not a professional actor. The show and enormous investment of time and money, failed.

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    Swinging London - Moaning For You, ca 1930

    Tęskniąc do ciebie (Moaning For You) Fokstrot z refrenem (Foxtrot with refrain) Uncredited British Band, Odeon, ca 1930 (?) (Polish pressing) NOTE: This tune is just wonderful! But this record, which I found a decade ago in one of my aunts attics - is scratched, it had been erroneosly labelled, as it seems, and to complete the collection of failures, someone glued on the original label the ugly red and hardly readable Polish title (Tęskniąc do ciebie). So, here is my question to all Most Honourable 78RPM Shellacks Collectors in You Tube: who can recognize this fantastic British jazzy little band, that performs here? The singer's voice rings the bell, alas recalling no exact name. I found in the web two other renditions of „Moaning For You": one American, by Coon-Sanders Nighthawks (1929) and second British, by Bert Ambrose Mayfair Hotel Orchestra (1930). I listened to both, but neither is so hot and jazzy like this one! ------------------------------ ATTENTION! Thanks Muscleco - our YT friend! 50 minutes after uploading, I am able to identify the recording! Here's the message I got a minute ago from Muscleco: "Looks like it is The Four Bright Sparks, Columbia CB-077 with Sam Browne vocal. rec May 21st 1930 in London. With Ted Heath on trumpet, Rudy Starita on xylophone". Wow!

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    Tango argentino Zaraza - Duet polaco: Wiera Gran - Albert Harris

    Regarded as Argentine, Uruguanan tango "Zaraza" was very popular also in Poland in prewar time with a title 'When guitar is playing the song'. This is very rare rendition made by two young Polish singers - Wiera Gran and Albert Harris, the only one they made together, short before outbreak of the WW2. Both experienced and suffered exile and emigration. Odeon O. 271536 Matr. Wo 2451 1939

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    Csárdás from Poland: Janusz Popławski sings Tokaj, ca 1930

    Tokaj (Hungarian foxtrot) - Janusz Popławski, vocal & Orkiestra taneczna "Odeon", dyr. Jerzy Gert, Odeon ca 1930

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    Tango - reklama: Morwitan, to nasz znak !, Adam Aston, 1937

    One of the very many Polish songs of 1930's which were designed and served as an advertisement of the goods for sale. The present one, "Morwitan, to nasz znak !", (Morwitan - it's our trade-mark !) was meant for the tissue-paper and tubes, produced by Herbewo firm, used for home production of tobacco cigarettes. The singer is Adam Aston; here, for the advertising action, named - J.Kierski. Syrena-Electro Warszawa, 1937

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    The Piccadilly Players - Ive Never Seen A Smile Like Yours, 1929

    The Piccadilly Players (Under the Direction by Al Starita) with Vocal Trio - I've Never Seen A Smile Like Yours, Columbia 1929 ------------------------------------------------------------ NOTE: In the history of hot dance bands of 1920s, two exquisite dance bands called Piccadilly (or The Piccadilly) Players have to be mentioned. One was the American dance orchestra - a house band for the Edison label, directed by Mel (Melville) Morris. Quite a few recordings of that excellent orchestra can be found in YT. The other was the British band, conducted by clarinetist Al Starita. He was formerly a member of Jack Hylton's famous dance orchestra, that played in one of best London West End night clubs - The Kit-Cat Club, in Haymarket. Hylton was engaged in numerous artistical occupations, and he often let Al Starita take over and conduct the band in his place, when the night was very busy. It's how, in the end of 1920s, the new dance band was born in London - The Piccadilly Players, that started recording for Columbia also as The Piccadilly Revels Band (conducted by Al's brother, Ray Starita).

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    Albert Harris - Krakowskie tango.

    Albert Harris "Krakowskie Ludwinowskie tango" Odeon N 45044a Wo 2455 Nagranie z 1939 roku. Płyta wytłoczona w 1945 roku z nową numeracją katalogową . Jak widać też błąd w opisie wykonawcy na etykiecie.

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    Polish prewar hit: Albert Harris - Bukiecik fiołków, 1937

    Albert Harris & Orkiestra taneczna "Odeon" - Bukiecik fiołków (A Small Bunch of Violets) Walc angielski (Artur Gold /Andrzej Włast) Odeon c. 1937 (Poland) NOTE: Albert Harris (born Aaron Hekelman; used also pseudonyms Albert Liff, Albert Holm) was born in 1911 in Warsaw, Poland. He was educated as pianist, was more popular as singer and composer. The most famous song he composed was "Piosenka o mojej Warszawie" (The Song About My Warsaw) he wrote as soldier of Polish Emigree Army in Italy in 1944. Recorded by Mieczysław Fogg in 1945, it became an unofficial hymn of the annihi;lated capital city of Poland, for the years of its resurrection from the ruins. Harris never came back to his beloved city, he chose to stay away from Poland, that - due to a shameful Roosevelt-Churchill Polish betrayal in Yalta - was ofgfered to Stalin as part of his communist empire. In 1946--1949 Harris stayed in Sweden, where he wrote music to several Swedish movies, in later years he travelled to the United States, where he died in 1974. The anonymous "Odeon dance orchestra" is probably directed by Jerzy Gert.

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    Old Polish Tango: Morfina, 1936

    Janusz Popławski & Ork. taneczna "Odeon" - Morfina - tango (S.Cresta /Izabella), Odeon 1936

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    La Cumparsita from Poland - Janusz Popławski, ca 1937

    La Cumparsita - tango (Rodriguez) - Orkiestra taneczna "Odeon", Refren śpiewa Janusz Popławski, Odeon ca 1937

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    Albert Harris - Marilou.

    Albert Harris "Marilou" Odeon 271268b Wo 1942 Nagranie z 1936 roku.

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    Die grosse Nikotin-Lüge

    WARUM KLÄREN DIE EXPERTEN NIE ÜBER DIE RELATIV GERINGEN GESUNDHEITLICHEN AUSWIRKUNGEN VON NIKOTIN SELBST AUF??? (bei einem gesunden Erwachsenen vorausgesetzt..wie bei allen Genussmitteln üblich) Sie hatten 6 JAHRE Zeit dazu beim Thema "E-Zigarette"!!!!!! Meist bleibt es nur bei einem lapidaren "Nikotin ist ein Nervengift und stark suchtauslösend" oder haufenweise Symptome von Überdosierungen. Was ist mit den normalen geringen Mengen Nikotin, die ein E-ZIgaretten-Nutzer inhaliert über einen Zeitraum von 24 Stunden? Nikotin selbst ist nicht der "Teufel" beim Tabakrauchen. Bei Nikotin OHNE Tabak (wie bei der E-Zigarette) fehlt sogar die stark suchterzeugende Eigenschaft (es wird also damit praktisch keine NEUEN Nikotinabhängigen mehr geben!)..das weiss auch die EU: Zitat: "Allgemein hat sich Nikotin ohne Tabak (und somit ohne Zusatzstoffe etc.) in Tierversuchen als kaum suchterzeugend herausgestellt." Für die schweren gesundheitlichen Folgen sind die Verbrennungsgiftstoffe im Tabakrauch verantwortlich. Klärt endlich die Öffentlichkeit über die geringen gesundheitlichen Folgen von Nikotin ohne Tabak auf...und zwar in den GERINGSTEN KLEINSTMENGEN, die man inhalativ konsumiert über den Tag verteilt! Und gebt die E-Zigarette endlich frei ohne weitere rechtlichen Steine, die ihr versucht in den Weg zu legen! Alles andere wäre unmenschlich und unmoralisch, da alle Experten WISSEN, wie schwer es ist, die TABAKsucht sein zu lassen!!! Sie ist ganz sicher auch nicht "unbedenklich"...aber tausendfach weniger schädlich als eine normale Tabakzigarette! KEIN Genussmittel ist "unbedenklich"! DKFZ (alle tabakbedingten Krankheiten...NIRGENDS auf den Seiten wird Nikotin erwähnt als Krankheitsverursacher!) Krebserzeugende Substanzen im Tabakrauch Gesundheitsschäden durch Rauchen und Passivrauchen Durch Rauchen und Passivrauchen verursachte Atemwegs- und Lungenerkrankungen Durch Rauchen und Passivrauchen verursachte Erkrankungen des Herz-Kreislaufsystems Durch Rauchen und Passivrauchen verursachte Krebserkrankungen Faltblatt von der Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung (BzgA) "Die Sucht und Ihre Stoffe - Nikotin"" Auf lange Sicht: Folgeschäden Während das Nikotin in erster Linie für die Suchterzeugung verantwortlich ist, werden die eigentlichen Gesundheitsschäden vornehmlich durch die zahlreichen anderen Schadstoffe verursacht, von denen etliche nachweislich krebserzeugend sind..." (Quelle: ) DKFZ: "Zusätzlich zu dem im Tabak enthaltenen Nikotin, das primär für die suchterzeugende Wirkung des Rauchens verantwortlich ist, werden den Zigaretten von den Herstellern weitere suchtverstärkende Substanzen beigemischt." (Quelle: ) Zitat: "Auch ist das Nikotin für die Folgen des Zigarettenrauchens nicht verantwortlich - es macht kein Emphysem, keine COPD und nicht einmal eine koronare Herzkrankheit (KHK). Das weiß man aus zahlreichen Studien zur Nikotinersatztherapie mit Kaugummis, Sprays oder Pflaster." (Quelle: ) Hinweis: Die Frau in der Szene hat diesen Erstickungsanfall überlebt und konnte am nächsten Tag das Krankenhaus wieder verlassen:

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    Albert Harris - Panno Zosiu ja funduje.

    Albert Harris "Panno Zosiu ja funduje" Odeon N 45061 b Wo 1956 Nagranie z 1936 roku. Płyta wytłoczona w 1945 roku z nową numeracją katalogową.

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    Tango Femme et Roses - Orkiestra Robert Renard, 1936

    Femme et Roses (L.Cibolla) Tango - Orkiestra Robert Renard, Odeon 1936 (Polish pressing) NOTE: I did not find much about that orchestra, that was active in Germany in the 1930s. Some sources say it could be a pseudonymn of Otto Dobrindt (the musician whose Dobbri Saxophon Orchestra was very popular in the Roaring Twenties in Berlin) - but it does not sound convincing to me. A rare sound trademark of Robert Renard's band was a Wurlitzer organ - not common in the instrumental line-up of the dance orchestras in those days. Here's another lovely rendition of that band:

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    Great White Way Orch. -- Yes! We Have No Bananas, 1923

    Great White Way Orchestra with Billy Murray -YesWeHaveNoBananas (Silver/Cohn), Victor 1923 --------------------------------------------------- YES ! WE HAVE NO BANANAS From the show "Make It Snappy" (Frank Silver / Irving Cohn) There's a fruit store on our street It's run by a Greek. And he keeps good things to eat But you should hear him speak! When you ask him anything, he never answers "no". He just "yes"es you to death, and as he takes your dough He tells you "Yes, we have no bananas We have-a no bananas today. We've string beans, and onions Cabbageses, and scallions, And all sorts of fruit and say We have an old fashioned to-mah-to A Long Island po-tah-to But yes, we have no bananas. We have no bananas today." Business got so good for him that he wrote home today, "Send me Pete and Nick and Jim; I need help right away." When he got them in the store, there was fun, you bet. Someone asked for "sparrow grass" and then the whole quartet All answered "Yes, we have no bananas We have-a no bananas today. Just try those coconuts Those walnuts and doughnuts There ain't many nuts like they. We'll sell you two kinds of red herring, Dark brown, and ball-bearing. But yes, we have no bananas We have no bananas today." Yes, we are very sorry to inform you That we are entirely out of the fruit in question The afore-mentioned vegetable Bearing the cognomen "Banana". We might induce you to accept a substitute less desirable, But that is not the policy at this internationally famous green grocery. I should say not. No no no no no no no. But may we suggest that you sample our five o'clock tea Which we feel certain will tempt your pallet? However we regret that after a diligent search Of the premises By our entire staff We can positively affirm without fear of contradiction That our raspberries are delicious; really delicious Very delicious But we have no bananas today. Yes, we gotta no banana No banana We gotta no banana today. I sella you no banana. Hey, Marianna, you gotta no banana?

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    Polish tango in Soviet Russia - Utomlennoe solntse, 1936

    The „Last Sunday" -- erroneously called „THAT Last Sunday" -- was composed by the Polish composer Jerzy Petersburski in 1936. It is a nostalgic tango with lyrics by Zenon Friedwald describing the final meeting of former lovers who are parting. The Polish title was: "To Ostatnia Niedziela" ("The Last Sunday"). The song was extremely popular and was performed by numerous artists (the best known performance by the pre-war Polish singer Mieczysław Fogg). Along the way, it first gained the nick-name of "Suicide Tango" due to its sad lyric (although, the real „suicie song" in the night restaurants of Warsaw -- where the shoot in the brow at 12 at night was not an unusual happening - was in 1930s another sad „Sunday": the „Gloomy Sunday" (in Polish: „Smutna niedziela") by a Hungarian composer Rezső Seress. Soon, it became an international hit; in the US sung by Billie Holiday. But Polish „Last Sunday" also had a terribly sad fate. During World War II In the concentrations camps it was often played while Jewish prisoners were led to the gas chambers and ovens, to be executed. During World War II its Russian version was prepared by Iosif Alveg and performed by Leonid Utyosov under the title of "Weary Sun" (Russian: "Utomlyennoye Solntse"). After World War II, the song remained largely successful and appeared in a number of films, including Yuriy Norshteyn's 1979 "Tale of Tales" (considered by many international critics to be the greatest animated film ever made), the award-winning Krzysztof Kieślowski's "White" (1994) and Nikita Mikhalkov's "Burnt by the Sun" of the same year. The Russian title of the song also became the name-sake for the latter film and -- as the result - for even more educated and worldly Russians, nowadays, it is considered as the „Russian national song"! Recording: Alexandr Cfasman Orkestr, Russian vocal refrain by Pavel Mihailov - Utomlennoe Solnce (J.Petersburski), Noginskij Zawod 1932

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    A disrupted way - Albert Harris, 1939

    Albert Harris (1911 Warsaw - 1976 USA) Singer and lyricist. Exquisite interpreter of popular songs in late 30s. He brought into a Polish school of singing of thirties an air of modernness. His way of emission and a delicate style did not have anything in common with a traditional operetta or a vaudeville; it was rather a good example of world-wide tendencies in a new style of singing in those times. After some recording trials in minor studios, he was engaged in 1936 on exclusive terms by Warsaw Odeon where under the musical direction of Jerzy Gert, was recording his beautifully interpreted songs until the outbreak of the WW 2nd . Since early forties he had been active as an artist on the USSR side (recordings in Lvov 1940 !) where, in 1944, wrote a hit of his life - "A Song about My Warsaw", the number which was moving Polish listeners at that time to tears. After the war, he sang again in Poland, although did not make any more recordings. Shortly afterwards escaped to the West (Sweden, Venezuela). Recording of the song known in France as VOUS, QUI PASSEZ SANS ME VOIR and in Germany as DU, DU GEHST AN MIR VORBEI made at Warsaw Odeon studio within the last days of freedom -- Summer 1939. Odeon N 45026 (re-edition 1945) Matr. Wo 2553 Rec. 1939

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    Stare polskie tango: Zwiędła chryzantema

    To my YT Friends who like old recordings, tangos, sentimental moods and - flowers: tango "Faded Chrysanthemum". Second Polish tango devoted to that most popular flower in the late days of October in my country. Music: Jerzy Petersburski Lyrics: Wacław Stępień Mieczysław Fogg and Syrena-Electro Orch., 1937.

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    Miss Polonia 1929, 1930, 1932 and a German tango in Polish: Królowa mych marzeń

    The German tango "Traumkönigin" was soon performed and recorded 1931 in Poland with a great success of the, at that time, very young Polish singer, Mieczysław Fogg. It is also interesting that the song was recorded for the Odeon label with the full contents of the lyrics ! To the video, there are attached original photos - from the JP's collection ! - of the first Misses of Poland: -1929 Władysława Kostakówna -1930 Zofia Batycka -1932 Zofia Dobrowolska Great thanks to my friend Parlophonman for the idea of this mutual presentation. The transfer from the 78rpm record - without any sound modification.

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    Old Tango from Poland: Stanisław Gruszczyński - Come To Me! 1932

    Stanisław Gruszczyński (vocal) Przyjdź (Come!) (Jerzy Petersburski / Andrzej Włast) Tango from the revue „Tęcza nad Warszawą (Rainbow Over Warsaw) in the theatre „Morskie Oko, Syrena Electro 1932 --------------------------------- Stanisław GRUSZCZYŃSKI (b. 1891 in Ludwinów by Wilno, died 1959 in Milanówek by Warsaw) - one of greatest Polish singers (tenor) in the history. During his schoolyears in Wilno, in the age of 14, he was engaged in the Polish anti-Tzarist conspiracy, for which he was expelled from school with no right to continue. Having a natural strong tenor, he decided to go to Warsaw where - in the years 1910-15, working as a waiter in Hotel Angielski, he had a chance to get into artistical circles and to receive first propositions for little roles in the theatres. At last, one of Hotel Angielski regular customers got interested in his vocal talents and helped him in the engagement into Warsaw Operetta. After the very first performance, his success was enormous. Overnight, he could choose among offers. He choose Radames in Warsaw Grand Theatre performance of „Aida", in 1916. This role he guaranteed him forever the nickname of the „Polish Caruso" as well as the solid rank among the greatest Polish tenors of the I-st half of XX century. During 1920 that nice village boy from nearby Wilno used to take all possible roles on the prime stages of Europe: La Scala, Madrid, Barcelona, Hamburg, Paris, Lisbon. Because of the lack of a solid music education he sung in Polish, usually causing the little sensations among conoisseurs and journalists. Nevertheless, they all agreed in one point: Europe has not had for a long time, such performer of Wagnerian roles! He was given enormous voice and phenomenal music memory. He could learn his part overnight. Therefore, he was exploited beyond measure. Lack of education, as well as his spontaneous, uncritical character, made him take at once any proposition and sing anywhere, without guaranteed conditions. Thus he sung in best operas as well as in the smoky cafes; he also performed in the movies. He recorded dozens of sides for best gramophone companies in Europe, which earned him a fortune. This was the beginning - and the end of his hi-speed life as a European celebrity. In the beginning of 1930s, having bought for himself a race horse team and a villa in the snobistic settlement area of Milanówek by Warsaw, he had to consider the first alarming signs of his voices decline. The critics started to complain about his failures on the stage. And suddenly, in 1932 his still great name appears on the posters advertising new revues in Warsaw cabaret "Morskie Oko" - where he was mercifully employed for the revue premiere. Soon he became alcoholic. During 2nd World War he worked as a doorman and a physical worker. After war, his long-time-ago fans arranged the modest jubilee for him in the Warsaw Opera, as well as they found for him the low-paid yet stabile employment in the Music Library. In 1958, he retired, to die soon on a hart attack, in poverty and oblivion.

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    Polish Tango: Tadeusz Faliszewski sings Jak ty, mój śnie, 1935

    Tadeusz Faliszewski & Orkiestra Syrena Rekord pod dyr. Iwo Wesby' ego - Jak ty, mój śnie (Like You, My Dream) (N.Brodszky/ L.Szmaragd) Tango z filmu "Piotruś" (Tango from the movie "Peter"), Syrena-Electro 1935 NOTE: If you want to learn more about a Polish-Jewish excellent bandleader Iwo Wesby, see

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    Warsaw in 1945: Piosenka o mojej Warszawie - W. Sypniewski

    Piosenka o mojej Warszawie (A Song About Warsaw Of Mine) (Muz. i słowa A. Harris) -- W. Sypniewski & Orkiestra pod dyr. M. Giżelskiego. Melodie ca 1945 (Poland) NOTE: It is probably the earliest and the least kown recording of that song, made after May 1945. The tender, poetical text was written during the Second World war by one of most popular prewar singers in Warsaw, Albert Harris. He was a member of an artistic team that accompanied with its music the struggles of Polish Emigree Army in the West, led by generel Władysław Anders. In Italy, during the bloody fights for Monte Cassino monastery, where thousands of Polish soldiers gave their lives, Harris wrote one of the most charming and nostalgic melodies in history of a song in Poland. The nostalgy for Warsaw, as it remains in memories, is confronted with a terrible truth of its devastation today. Yet, the song ends with exclamation of hope, that Warsaw will grow up again and resurrect it's beauty through the sacrifice of blood, given by Polish soldiers, all over Europe. In my slideshow I tried to give picture to that ambiguity of feelings: to Harris' hope mixed with a despair. And -- to both visions he had in his heart while writing: Warsaw in it's glamour, and in it's decline. ----------------------------------------------------- I have no idea who the singer was, neither I know the least detail about orchestra and its leader. Considering very low label number, this must be one of the earliest sides produced by Melodje -- the first Polish record manufacture established after 1945. It's studio was not organised in Warsaw but in a relatively less destroyed city of Poznań. Melodje Records -- that deserve well of its merits in recreating the music life in Poland and its archivisation in a totally destroyed country -- was closed by the communists in 1949 after only a few years of activity, as soon as the Stalinst regime was fully installed in Poland.

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    Polish tango: Tęskno mi , FALISZEWSKI 1934

    Tęskno mi (I Am Longing) Tango z teatru "Wielka Rewia" (Tango from a Grand-Revue Theatre, Warsaw) (Muz. A.Lewandowski/ Tekst: A.Włast) - Jan Pobóg (Tadeusz Faliszewski), Orch. dir. by Iwo Wesby, Melodja-Electro 1934 (Poland) NOTE: In the Ist half of 1930s Melodja-Electro existed as a popular, yet ephemeric label, an offspring of "Syrena Electro". The records were cheaper (cost 1 zloty, while Syrena cost about 2,o zloty) although their quality was not worse than Syrena's. Considered a "cheap label" it was ignored by many front-line artists, who never recorded there (Mieczysław Fogg, Adam Aston, Hanka Ordonówna) or recorded under pseudonyms, like Tadeusz Faliszewski ("Jan Pobóg") or Wiera Gran ("Mariol"). In the slideshow are the vintage photographs of the city of Bydgoszcz, where I was born. Many of these beautiful Jugendstil apartment houses still exist but the atmosphere of a tidy, well organised and prosperous middle class town in Pomerania, completely evaporated with the outbreak of 2nd World War. In September 1939, as soon as German troops invaded Poland, the town was a scene for the first homicide in the modern history of Europe. During first days of a German occupation, 10 % of the 150,ooo population of the town - its whole elite (teachers, doctors, lawyers etc.) - were murdered in mass executions in the Old Town Square and in so-called today Death Valley in a suburbian village Fordon. It was the first stage of German-Soviet plan -- in reference to Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact of August, 1939 and the Gestapo-NKVD mettings in occupied Poland, in the months to follow - of decapitation of the Polish society by depriving it of its elites and turning Poles into a "slave-nation". It is my second uploading of this tune (previous was in September 2008 and it was uncomplete - first 20 seconds of recording were missing ). So now, there is a complete version of that haunting tango accompanied by a nicer selection of the vintage photoes of my beloved town.

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    Albert Harris - Gdy mnie nie będzie , 1938

    Albert Harris & Orkiestra "Odeon" - Gdy mnie nie będzie (When I Am Gone) tango (W.Krupiński /A.Włast), Odeon 1938

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    Old Polish tango: Czy pamiętasz tę noc w Zakopanem?

    Czy pamiętasz tę noc w Zakopanem? (Do You Remember That Night In Zakopane?) (Muzyka: Zygmunt Karasiński, Text: Aleksander Jellin) - Tadeusz Miller & Orkiestra K. Bryzka, Melodje 1945 (circa) It's one of still popular old Polish songs: tango composed in 1937 by Zygmunt Karasiński and devoted to Zakopane - the most fashionable winter spa in Poland (see: Here the song is performed by a very popular post-war singer Tadeusz Miller. His career was short, in 1947 he died in a car crash. The record was produced by "Melodje" - the private record factory established immediately after WWII in the city of Poznań. Also the life of that enterprise was short: ""Melodje" died in late 1940s, as soon the stalinist regime completed its installation in Poland. (see also: )

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    Tango from Warsaw: Smutne tango - Tadeusz Faliszewski, 1936

    The huge archives of „Syrena-Electro" Company in Warsaw were destroyed first, by the Nazis, during the German occupation of Poland in 1939-45 and -- after the war - when some the matrixes survived the Teutonic devastation fury - they were abandoned and forgotten by the communists, considered the „pre-war burgeois remnants". Yet, some of the matrixes were rescued by a miracle and ( - the hereby „Sad Tango" belongs to them!) re-pressed in 1946 by the communist-tolerated private record company in Poznan: „Melodje". And that's exactly where this uploading comes from. ______________________________ Recording: Smutne tango (Sad Tango) (M.Wróblewski/Olga Org) - Ork. tan. Syrena Rekord, Refren śpiewa Tadeusz Faliszewski, Syrena-Electro 1936 (Melodje, c. 1946)

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    Albert Harris - Lambeth Walk.

    Albert Harris "Lambeth Walk" Odeon O 271532a Wo 2442 Nagranie z 1938 roku.

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    Adam Aston - Dobranoc kochanie 1938

    Dobranoc, kochanie (Goodnight, Darling) Tango (Zygmunt Karasiński / Zenon Friedwald) - Adam Aston & Orkiestra taneczna „Odeon" pod dyr. Jerzego Gerta, Odeon 1938 NOTE: About author of text, Zenon Friedwald see: The composer is Zygmunt Krasiński (see Attention: in the slideshow, the photo of a poet Jerzy Jurandot - also author of great prewar hits - has replaced by mistake the one of Friedwald's. Sorry, but it'd be too much a mess to repair the error, so I'm leaving it as it is, just with this correcting note.

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    Kury - Jesienna deprecha

    Mam znowu doła Znów pragnę śmierci Wracają stare lęki I nie mogę w nocy spać Ból przemijania Choroby, wojny, rozpacz Wszystkie ciemne strony życia Dręczą mnie ach kurwa mać Brazylijski serial już nie cieszy jak kiedyś Nawet seks jest banalny i nie kręci mnie Może jestem nienormalny, za krótko byłem w wojsku Może w lecie jakiś komar adidasa sprzedał mi... Mam znowu doła Znów pragnę śmierci Wszystkie formy samobója Przed oczyma stają mi Sam już nie wiem co robić mam Nie chcę dłużej smażyć tłuczonego szkła Mam już dość leżenia pod kałużą Ratuj mnie jesienny mały boże

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    German Tango: Eugen Wolff Orch. - Nachtliche Gitarren, 1945

    Nocne gitary (Nachtliche Gitarren) Tango (J.Rixner) - Orkiestra Stanisława Godarskiego (Eugen Wolff m.s. Tanz-Orchester) Melodje 1945 (Polish pressing) Odeon 1940 (German matrix) NOTE: In Poland, in short period 1945-47, when the Soviet-style Stalinism was not yet fully installed, a privately owned little record factory „Melodje" located in a small apartment house in the heart of the Old Town of Poznań, issued many very good recordings of the post-WWII Polish jazz & swing orchestras (e.g. Bracia Łopatowscy, Charles Bovery or Kazimierz Bryzek's bands) as well as the excellent jazz and non-jazz Polish singers (Marta Mirska, Tadeusz Miller, the revellers choir Cztery Asy). Also issued were the sides re-pressed from miraculously saved prewar matrixes of Syrena Rekord or Odeon companies. Among them, sometimes you could find the intruguing and, usually, being on the highest artistical level jazz or just the dance numbers, performed by the mysterious band „Orkiestra Stanisława Godarskiego" (Stanisław Godarski's Orchestra). The problem is: such bandleader or such orchestra did never exist! The name was pure hoax, and the sides holding such label were re-recordings of popular nazi-Germany orchestra tunes (God knows in what kind of technology?!) from the matrixes, or from actual records, that were left in Poland by the nazis during their panick evacuation back to Germany, in January 1945. The usage of the label name „St. Godarski" entitled the owners of "Melodje Records" to avoid payments of royalties as well as it protected them from political accusals of being any kind of a pro-nazi conspiracy... I was fortunate to have identified this very side, as German Eugen Wolff's dance orchestra, originally recorded by Odeon, Berlin 1940. Another great tango of Josef Rixner - one of best composers in Germany in late 1930s, also the composer of "Blauer Himmel" - can be listened to if you go

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    Przedwojenna Polska - Tango, Faliszewski 1930

    This tango "Głos z daleka" (which translates into English as "Voice From Afar") is kind of weird. The music is haunting, while the text is just repulsive. A very bad poetry, almost graphomanic - about some voice, which calls the singer thru the windy, snowy, wintery night, and - guess, what a voice is it? A voice of love, as all of us probably guessed. (Before love - also appears, God knows why, the voice od "a suffering"). Yet, alltogetger, this text and this music make an unforgetable tango - very popular in pre-war Poland. It's smooth, rhythmical and keen in seducing us - like all tangos do - in their old, kitschy and irresistable way of seducing.

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    The effects of nicotine on human health

    The public needs to understand the differences between the addictive nature of nicotine, and the smoke that kills smokers. Get the real facts in this video.

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    Tango Violino Tzigano in Polish - Mieczysław Fogg !

    Polish version of the great hit composed by Bixio, recorded in Poland in 1936.

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    Ada, to nie wypada - Jerzy Gert Orch. & Albert Harris, 1936

    Albert HARRIS (né Aaron Hekelman; b. 1911 in Warsaw, d. 1974 in USA) - pianist, composer and a popular singer in pre-war Warsaw. Jerzy GERT (né Józef Gärtner; b. 1908 in Tarnow, d. 1968 in Krakow) -- conductor and composer. In 1924-1932 he studied in Wien to become director of the Lwow Philharmonia (1931 -1941), as well as the music manager of the Polish branch of „Odeon" records. After WWII he founded the Orchester and Choir of Polish Radio in Krakow. In 1957-62 he was the artistical director of Krakow Philharmonia. Recording: Albert Harris, Orkiestra taneczna „Odeon" pod dyr. Jerzego Gerta - Ada, to nie wypada! (Ada! It Misbecomes You!) (from the comedy movie „Ada, to nie wypada!") (Muz. Zygmunt Wiehler /Tekst: Jerzy Jurandot) Odeon 1936

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    Albert Harris - Karawana.

    Albert Harris "Karawana" muzyka D. Ellington orkiestrą dyryguje Jerzy Gert Odeon O 271532b Wo 2443 nagranie z 1938 roku.

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    Old Polish tango: Jak drogie są wspomnienia, Warsaw 1936

    Janusz Popławski, Ork. „Odeon" pod dyr. Jerzego Gerta - Jak drogie są wspomnienia (A. Scher / E.Schlechter) (z filmu „Jadzia"), Odeon 1936 ---------------------------------- Janusz POPŁAWSKI -- operetta tenor; one of most popular Polish prewar singers, he was also a very prolific refrainist for Polish „Odeon". --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Alfred (Fred) SCHER -- born 1900 in Złoczów/by Lwów, died 1968 in New York; one of the most talented composers in inter-war Poland, all of his songs were immediately recorded by „Syrena Electro", „Odeon" or „Columbia" becoming „the schlagers" (the immortal tango „Jak gdyby nigdy nic", or the valse-boston „Szkoda" and „Ty i ja" - for one of the last Polish pre-war movies „Amerykańska awantura"). He also wrote soundtracks for the music-comedies („Każdemu wolno kochać", „Książątko"). In 1937 he went to Paris, where he got a job at „Lido" as a pianist. In 1939 he took a part in the defence of France, then he was wounded and interned in the nazi-camp near Koenigsberg. Released - due to his family's efforts - he was sent back to France and to the South, where he recovered in Auch -- writing numerous patriotic songs. He earned his living as a pianist in Marseille, and soon after the war was ended in 1947 he got a prestigeous position as a director of the French Broadcast. Accused for "being a communist" (he sympathised with the French Communist Party) in 1954 he emigrated to USA. Having unsuccessfully tried to establish connections with the emigree Jewish composers' and film makers' circles in Hollywood he ended up in New York, where he was wounded by the street manic, who hit him with a knife. Disabled to write, he died in oblivion in NYC, in 1968. ----------------------------------- Emanuel SCHLECHTER -- (born 1906 in Lwow, died 1943 in Lwow), poet and author of texts of dozens of interwar Polish hits. He studied the law in Lwow, to become one of the most prolific authors of song texts („schlagworts"). He always very strongly emphasised his Jewish identity. He also sung, and recorded a couple of sides as a peformer, with piano accompaniament. Just before onset of WW II he wrote a few anti-nazi songs for the premiere show of Warsaw cabaret „Ali-Aaba", planned for September 1939. Ofcourse, due to onset of WWII the premiere never came true, and the author ot the anti-Adolf songs was immediately searched for by the nazis. Captured in Lwow, he ended up in the Ghetto. For a while and as much as he was able to, he tried to arrange the „Ghetto artistic life". Finally - he, his wife and their few years old son -- become the victims of the Lwow ghetto annihilation in 1943. -------------------------------------- Jadwiga SMOSARSKA -- the brightest star among prewar Polish film actresses. „Jadzia"- and her role as a tennis champion - made one of the most charming Polish prewar movie comedies.

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    Stare Polskie Tango - Tango Artura Golda Przy kominku - Mieczysław Fogg - 1937!

    Pre-war crooner Mieczysław Fogg sings Artur Gold's tango "Przy kominku" Music by Artur Gold Lyrics by Andrzej Włast Performed with the "Syrena Electro" Orchestra under the direction of Iwo Wesby SE mx 27458 1937r. The lovely lyrics to this tango are as follows: Spośrod starych płyt gramofonowych, Amongst the old grammaphone records, Jedną najpiękniejszą znam, I know a most beautiful one, Czasem, kiedy wieczór jest zimowy, Sometimes, during the winter evening, Tę niemodną płytę sobie gram. I play myself this unfashionable record. Zdaje mi się wtedy, że wróciłaś, I believe then, that you have returned I wróciła młodość moja znów, and my youth has returned again, Snuje się za nami słowo "miłość", The word "love" lingers behind us, Najpiękniejsze spośród wszystkich słów... The most beautiful of all words... Przy kominku mrok zapadł szary jak mgła, By the fireplace darkness as grey as fogg has fallen, "Przy kominku" piosenkę starą ktoś gra. "By the fireplace" somebody is playing an old song. Powracają wspomnienia z dawnych tych dni, Memories of those old days are coming back, Gdy po raz pierwszy "kocham Cię" mowiłaś mi... When for the first time you told me "I love you"...

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    The Many Faces of Smoking: the effects of nicotine on brain and behavior

    Professor Marina Picciotto opens the sixth season of Tilde Cafe discussions. While nicotine is a plant alkaloid, we (and even the electric eel and insects, among other organisms) have nicotinic acetylcholine receptors where nicotine can bind. The native molecule that binds to this receptor is acetylcholine. But we have two types of acetylcholine receptors, both of which respond very differently when acetylcholine binds to them, so in order to distinguish them, they are referred to as either nicotinic (binds nicotine) or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, binds muscarine, which is also not native to our bodies. Broadly, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors while located primarily in the nervous system and skeletal muscles, they are found almost everywhere in our bodies. More specifically though, the details of the receptor makeup varies with where the receptor is located, and consequently, when nicotine binds to it, the receptor response is dictated by its makeup. Further, the receptor is not a single protein, but made up of multiple subunits, and nicotine does not bind all the subunits, only some, and with varying degrees of affinity -- the highest affinity binding subunit (beta-2) is a component of the receptor found in the brain, in the specific regions that are part of the reward circuitry. And from reward circuitry, a term one sees associated with excessive eating, we also learned a little about how chemicals that resemble nicotine have been shown to play a role in reducing food intake -- and for the rest of the story, check the footage of the afternoon.

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    The New York Twelve - Youre Driving Me Crazy, 1930

    The New York Twelve (dir. by Harry Reser)- You're Driving Me Crazy (W.Donaldson) Hit Of The Week, 1930

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    Waltz from Poland: Tylko we Lwowie , 1939

    Tylko we Lwowie! (Only In Lwów!) Walc z filmu "Włóczęgi" (Waltz from the film "Wanderers") (muz. Henryk Wars, tekst Emanuel Schlechter) - Orkiestra taneczna "Odeon", śpiewa Albert Harris, Odeon 1939 ---------------------------------- This song was one of the last great hits in the interbellum Poland. It was composed by Henryk Wars to the text of the Lwów songwriter and poet, Emanuel Schhlechter (- who 2 years later perished in the Lwow nazi ghetto) for a musical comedy "Wanderers" (Włóczęgi) (premiere was in April 1939), with the memorable performances of two original prewar "hoodlums" of Lwów, Szczepko and Tońko. Those too were the most popular radio performers in 1930s, due to their on-air program "On Lwów's radiowave" (Na lwowskiej fali). Here, the song is sung - in a charming Lwow's dialect - by a popular singer Albert Harris, who was a house singer for Polish "Odeon". This song still today belongs to the "obligatory" songbook of every Polish Lwów lover. The city - one of oldest Polish metropolies, compared - so for its glorius history as its monumetal beauty - only with Cracow, now belongs to Western Ukraine. Lwow's tragic fate started on September 17, 1939 - when the Red Army - Hitler's most devoted ally - invaded Poland from the East - under the same pretext, as it recently was in Abchasia & Osetia, or in so many other neighbouring countries in the long history of Russia's imperialist invasions - of "bringing the peace and military ptotection to the Belorussian and Ukrainian minorities living in that area". Lwow was proclaimed the city "released from the Polish burgeois' and gentry regime" and the NKWD (former KGB) mass arresting, executions and deportations of Polish citizens of Lwow to Siberia, Kazakhstan etc., started. In 1945, that lively, beautiful, a half-million metropoly was almost totally "cleared" off the Polish inhabitants, who dwelled there trought many generations. See the clip from the original movie, with Szczepko & Tońko singing the tune:

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    Foxtrot from Warsaw: Janusz Popławski - Czy mnie chcesz?

    Janusz Popławski & Orkiestra taneczna "Odeon" - Czy mnie chcesz? (Do You Want Me?)Fokstrot (Hulimka /Laskowski), Odeon ca 1930 NOTE 1: It's a kind of an absurd-song: the orchestration containing a lot of music-jokes (why, for God's sake, are there Russian motifs? Perhaps, as it seems - for the sake of so-called "Russian Foxtrotts" that were fashionable in Europe in turn of 1920/30s. Lyrics are the same nonsense: a male hero tells his extremely Narcisstic story about himself. "Today it's time for you to declare - he's addressing his demand to a girlfriend - if you want me/ I'm a sole ideally defectless example in the world/I hear nothing but choir of praises around me/They all set me as a model design/ And last but not least, I'm rich/ So you want me, I'm sure!" NOTE 2: The slideshow is dedicated to the pretty, masculine face and two thinking eyes of Adam Brodzisz. Ofcourse, that lovely actor and a clever man, would have never said anything so selfish as a hero of the song. Never the less, his face was one of the male models of the 1930s Poland, and somewhat it very well matches - so the tune, as lyrics. Adam BRODZISZ (1906-1986) was considered the most handsome actor in the pre-war Poland. Born in Lwow, after his matriculation exam he won a competition for the „Most Photogenic Face and he got his first film engagement. Very quickly, he became a „pin-up boy for most of the Polish girls in 1920s/30s. He acted in popular romence-movies with the best actors: Jadwiga Smosarska, Kazimierz Junosza-Stępowski, Eugeniusz Bodo and Maria Bogda, who became his partner in many melodramatic movies, and finally his wife. In 1931 he established together with the actor Eugeniusz Bodo and the film director, Michał Waszynski a film production „B-W-B; he also performed in a couple of French movies produced by Paramount Pictures, but lack of knowledge of the languages obturated his worldwide career. During 2nd World War he stayed in Warsaw, working as a waiter in cafe „Napoleonka. He took part, as a soldier, in the Warsaw Uprising of August-October 1944. After the fall of Warsaw, he and his wife moved out to Zakoppane - a mountain spa in Southern Poland - where for several years they run a small pension „Brodziszówka. They also occassionally took part as guest stars in the provincial stage performances. In 1950-55 Adam Brodzisz had a permenent job as an actor in the dramatic theatre in Bielsko-Biala, near Cracow. In 1961 he and his wife were invited together with the theatre trouppe to USA, with the Gabriela Zapolskas play „Skiz. Adam Brodzisz and his wife never returned to Poland, they settled in Los Angeles, California, where he worked as a chinchilla farm manager. Later, he also dealt with a computer drawing. He died in 1986 in Desert Hot Spring, California.

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    Are e cigarettes without nicotine safe?

    Electronic cigarette are nicotine free, this video tell you in brief, so this are harmless so smoke only electronic cigarette.

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    Alkohol- und Nikotin-Rausch - Welt der Wunder

    Alkohol enthemmt - Nikotin beruhigt. Die angenehme Wirkung, die von diesen beiden Drogen ausgeht, ist vielfältig. Was steckt hinter dem wohligen Gefühl des Rauschs, welche Auswirkungen hat er auf unseren Körper und was macht die Faszination an Alkohol und Zigaretten aus?... Weitere Videos aus der Rubrik "Mensch & Natur": ______________________ Welt der Wunder TV sendet auf ASTRA 19,2° Ost, Entertain (Kanal 89), Zattoo & im Live Stream über die Welt der Wunder TV Apps für iPhone, iPad, Android ( Smart TV sowie www.weltderwunder.tv Links: • Abonniert unseren YouTube Kanal: • Entdeckt Welt der Wunder: • Klickt „Gefällt mir" bei Facebook: • Folgt uns bei Twitter: • Mehr Videos findet Ihr in unserer Mediathek:

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    Polish Tango: Hanka Ordonówna - Kogo nasza miłość obchodzi, 1932

    Hanka Ordonówna with piano accopmaniament - Kogo nasza miłość obchodzi? (Whe Cares About Our Love)(Music & Text: Marian Hemar)Tango from theatre "Banda", Syrena Electro 1932 ------------------------------------------- This is another beautiful (and less known) Hanka Ordonówna's tango, written (music and lyrics) by Marian Hemar - a fine poet and one of the best lyricists in pre-war Warsaw. This dramatic love story finds its bitter conclusion in the refrain's canto: "Who cares about our love? Just you and I/ Who will be hurt by our love? Just you and I/ Whose eyes will be blinded with tears from our love? Just yours and mine/ Who will be killed by our love? Just you and I". The slideshow are early and late photos of Hanka Ordonówna - la plus grande vedette in the history of the Polish song.

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    Albert Harris - Co to może być

    Albert Harris "Co to może być ?" Borg , Lipski - Szlengel Odeon Nagranie z płyty "Poljazz" - Zatańczmy fokstrota

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    Polish Tango from Berlin: Dajos Béla plays Bronisław Kaper, 1929

    Dajos Béla m.s. Tanz- Orchester - Tränen weint jede Frau so gern - Tango (Every Woman Is So Easy To Weep) (Bronisław Kaper), Odeon 1929 NOTE: Bronisław KAPER - Polish composer and pianist, born in Warsaw in 1902. He studied music (in class of piano and composition) at Warsaw Conservatory. During his studies he started writing "schlagers" for the Warsaw cabarets. For Mieczysław Fogg he wrote tango „Why Do You Keep Repeating It?" (Czemu mi wciąż powtarzasz?), English waltz „Maybe Yes, Maybe No" (Może tak, może nie) for Zofia Terné, or foxtrot „I Have A Good Heart" (Ja dobre serce mam!) for the revue theatre „Morskie Oko". After his studies, he went to Berlin where he met a famous composer Walter Jurmann, who suggested him write music for the cinema. In 1933 Bronisław Kaper composed music for the international cinema hit „A Song for You" (Ein Lied für Dich) with a world famous Polish tenor Jan Kiepura; the song from that film: „Ninon", quickly became an international evergreen. In the same year 1933, soon after Adolf Hitler's nazi party took power in Germany, he fortunately decided to leave for France. In Paris he met Louis B. Meyer who signed a contract with him for writing music for the Hollywood movies. The cooperation with MGM lasted 28 years of Bronisław Kapers life. He composed music for about 150 movies, including such great pictures as „San Francisco" with Jeannette McDonald, „A Night At The Opera" with the Marx Brothers, „Everybody Sing" with Judy Garland, „Mutiny On The Bounty" with Clark Gable or the immortal „Lili"(1952). In 1953 he received Oscar. As a member of the American Film Academy he promoted worldwide the Polish film school, with Roman Polański, Andrzej Wajda and other Polish film directors of the 1960/70s., who - thanks to his influences and activity - could reckon on a friendly reception in the United States. Bronisław Kaper died in 1983 in LA, California.

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