Playlist Of Robert Arditti

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    A Good Diffused

    6:28

    Adrienne Arditti, soprano; Jessi Rosinski, flute; Jeff Means, percussion; Maarten Stragier, Alex Dunn, Robert Ward, guitar; Elaine Rombola, harpsichord; Yukiko Takagi, piano; Gabriela Diaz, violin; Ben Schwartz, cello; Stephen Drury, conductor

    Rand Steiger (b. 1958, USA)
    A Good Diffused

    Boston Guitarfest 2013
    Thursday, June 20, 2013
    Fenway Center at Northeastern University

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    Giacinto Scelsi - Trio for Strings, I-II

    8:19

    Trio for strings (1958)

    I. 1er Mouvement
    II. 2e Mouvement
    III. 3e Mouvement
    IV. 4e Mouvement

    Robert Zimansky, violin
    Patrick Demenga, cello
    Christoph Schiller, viola

    When the scores for Scelsi's string works at last came into the hands of Irvine Arditti in the late '70s, the great violinist said It appears rather a large fish has got through our nets. By that time, Scelsi, though still alive, had virtually stopped composing. All that he did compose after about 1975 were new versions of older pieces. The Arditti String Quartet, among numerous others, became energetic champions of his work, presumably agreeing with Franco Donatoni that Scelsi was the third of three great Italian composers born in the early part of the twentieth century. Members of the Arditti in fact performed the world-premiere of the trio in 1986, in London, almost 30 years after it was composed. The musical world has indeed been tardy in granting Scelsi, a mysterious, controversial, elusive figure, the recognition that he so richly deserves. The process of fighting for his cause goes on even today, when some continue to unjustly accuse him of dilettantism.

    The birth of Scelsi's String Trio is tied intimately to that of the famous Quattro pezzi su una nota sola (for chamber orchestra, 1959). Together they are the first pieces Scelsi would compose in his characteristic monotonal style, music focused with maniacal intensity on the elaboration of single pitches. Whereas his earlier music had depended heavily upon use of the piano, his new direction required instruments capable of microtonal inflection, of which the piano is incapable. The String Trio is his most important first step in that direction that would take him so far. It is in many ways a study for the Quattro pezzi which, by their timbral lushness, outshine the trio in influence and importance.

    His division of the trio into quasi-classical movements betrays his sustained respect for tradition. Despite his radical simplifications, Scelsi didn't abandon belief in the need for clear formal designs. Each of the four movements of the trio elaborates a single pitch, using microtonal fluctuations, complex rhythms, and varying expressive manners, and deft changes of tone color, using mutes, and varied articulations. Unlike the later music, which tends to exclude lower registers entirely, the trio focuses on the middle to low registers, even descending to the low C of the cello at one point. The melodic path of the movements is as follows: F sharp (first movement), C (second), B (third), B flat (fourth). The pitches are expressed in three different octaves each time so that, although frequently piano piano, the sound is always full. Indeed, there is something tremendous and Sphinx-like in the sound of naked octaves. Some other notes are occasionally introduced to the mix, resulting in some thirds and sixths, but we always hear these entirely in relation to the home pitch of the movement, as if they were only overtones of it. The addition of these ornamental pitches in no way undermines the focused integrity of the piece, which never wavers from its goal of opening our ears to the third, spherical dimension of sound. [allmusic.com]

    Art by Michaël Borremans

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    Giacinto Scelsi - Trio for Strings, III-IV

    7:08

    Trio for strings (1958)

    I. 1er Mouvement
    II. 2e Mouvement
    III. 3e Mouvement
    IV. 4e Mouvement

    Robert Zimansky, violin
    Patrick Demenga, cello
    Christoph Schiller, viola

    When the scores for Scelsi's string works at last came into the hands of Irvine Arditti in the late '70s, the great violinist said It appears rather a large fish has got through our nets. By that time, Scelsi, though still alive, had virtually stopped composing. All that he did compose after about 1975 were new versions of older pieces. The Arditti String Quartet, among numerous others, became energetic champions of his work, presumably agreeing with Franco Donatoni that Scelsi was the third of three great Italian composers born in the early part of the twentieth century. Members of the Arditti in fact performed the world-premiere of the trio in 1986, in London, almost 30 years after it was composed. The musical world has indeed been tardy in granting Scelsi, a mysterious, controversial, elusive figure, the recognition that he so richly deserves. The process of fighting for his cause goes on even today, when some continue to unjustly accuse him of dilettantism.

    The birth of Scelsi's String Trio is tied intimately to that of the famous Quattro pezzi su una nota sola (for chamber orchestra, 1959). Together they are the first pieces Scelsi would compose in his characteristic monotonal style, music focused with maniacal intensity on the elaboration of single pitches. Whereas his earlier music had depended heavily upon use of the piano, his new direction required instruments capable of microtonal inflection, of which the piano is incapable. The String Trio is his most important first step in that direction that would take him so far. It is in many ways a study for the Quattro pezzi which, by their timbral lushness, outshine the trio in influence and importance.

    His division of the trio into quasi-classical movements betrays his sustained respect for tradition. Despite his radical simplifications, Scelsi didn't abandon belief in the need for clear formal designs. Each of the four movements of the trio elaborates a single pitch, using microtonal fluctuations, complex rhythms, and varying expressive manners, and deft changes of tone color, using mutes, and varied articulations. Unlike the later music, which tends to exclude lower registers entirely, the trio focuses on the middle to low registers, even descending to the low C of the cello at one point. The melodic path of the movements is as follows: F sharp (first movement), C (second), B (third), B flat (fourth). The pitches are expressed in three different octaves each time so that, although frequently piano piano, the sound is always full. Indeed, there is something tremendous and Sphinx-like in the sound of naked octaves. Some other notes are occasionally introduced to the mix, resulting in some thirds and sixths, but we always hear these entirely in relation to the home pitch of the movement, as if they were only overtones of it. The addition of these ornamental pitches in no way undermines the focused integrity of the piece, which never wavers from its goal of opening our ears to the third, spherical dimension of sound. [allmusic.com]

    Art by Michaël Borremans

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    Arditti Quartet - Nunes, Zimmerlin, Feldmann, Lachenmann: Works for String Quartet

    1:37

    Arditti Quartet LIVE Basel Hans Huber Saal December 1, 2015
    Alfred Zimmerlin (1955) string quartet No 4_Fatrasie. Hommage à Jürg Wyttenbach


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    Ballagàrradith - Roberto Sarti

    4:10

    Ballagàrradith for solo violin.
    Violinist: Irvine Arditti.
    Composer: Roberto Sarti.

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    Arditti Quartet. Iannis Xenakis: Tetras 2/2

    5:29

    Iannis Xenakis: Tetras, performed by Arditti Quartet

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    Jake Arditti - Come Nube

    4:22

    Countertenor Jake Arditti sings Come Nube, taken from a live performance recording of Handel's Agrippina.

    FIND ME:

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    CONTACT:

    info@musichall.uk.com

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    Señales - Hommage to Jonathan Harvey

    4:07

    Señales, Homage to Jonathan Harvey (2012)
    Commissioned by Miller Theatre for their portrait series 2012. Premiered by Irvine Arditti, violin and Ensemble Signal, conducted by Brad Lubman at Miller Theatre , New York 2012

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    John Cage … 1. Quietly Flowing Along

    4:06

    [Quatuor à cordes en quatre parties]
    1949-1950.
    Dédicace : For Lou Harrison
    Arditti Quartet : Irvine Arditti, David Alberman, violins / Levine Andrade, viola / Rohan de Saram, cello.



    Image: Philippe S. Ivanejev, trantran

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    Lost Vivaldi opera discovered in Venice, with music from the Four Seasons 4K UHD

    56

    Vivaldi's lost opera discovered in Venice. Voices of Music is thrilled to present the world premiere of the overture to Vivaldi's opera Disco Volante, performed from a newly discovered manuscript which was unearthed in a trattoria in Venice. Vivaldi later reworked the overture for the beginning of the Four Seasons, with a few minor changes. The manuscript sheds valuable insight into the opera staging practices in Venice. The proprietor of the trattoria, Giacomo Arditti, was in the midst of a remodel when manuscript pages of music literally flew out from inside the walls, where they had been stuffed for centuries as a sort of insulation against the tutti i Venti in guerra. Arditti, an enthusiastic collector of antique Venetian Carnival masks, immediately realized the significance of the find. Sadly, only a few pages of the complete work have survived, owing to the inevitable Acqua alta of Venice.
    Voices of Music
    Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors
    Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, Italy, 1660
    David Daniel Bowes, baroque viola by Richard Duke, London, England, ca. 1780
    Lisa Grodin, baroque violin by Paulo Antonio Testore, Larga di Milano, Italy, 1736
    Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791
    Adaiha MacAdam-Somer, baroque cello, Anonymous, 18th century
    Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Timothy Johnson, Bloomington, Indiana, 1999
    (after Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, Italy, 17th century)
    Farley Pearce, violone by George Stoppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560
    David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012, after Tieffenbrucker, c1610
    Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde,
    Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century northern German instruments
    Double manual harpsichord by Joop Klinkhamer, Amsterdam (1996), based on the Ruckers-Goujon in the Musee d’Art et d’Histoire, Neuchâtel, Switzerland.
    Save the Arts composed by Ms. van Proosdij and performed on the harpsichord.
    HD Audio & Video: David Tayler, Hanneke van Proosdij, Lloyd Hryciw and Hiro Matsuo
    Sound effects, DSP, Color and post processing: David Tayler
    Animation story, concept and design: David Tayler & Hanneke van Proosdij
    3D modelling, design and animation: Cascade Media Group

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    Flamenco & Tchaikovsky rococo variations Adriancello Mantu

    4:56

    Adrian Mantu violoncello soloist cello orchestra Orchestra Symphony Brasov Romania Ireland Music classic Popular Folk Flamenco Spanish Romanian Romantic Russian Tchaikovsky rococo variations Dance Tagel Flamenco band conductor
    Adrian MANTU
    cellist
    member of the ConTempo String Quartet

    Adrian was born in Bucharest and is a post-graduate of the University of Music in Bucharest. His studies continued at the Banff Centre for the Arts in Canada, Accademia Chigiana in Siena, Royal Academy of Music in London, Escuela Superior de Musica Reina Sophia in Madrid and European Academy of Music in Aix-en-Provence where he studied with Stefan Popov, Zara Nelsova, Radu Aldulescu, Lawrence Lesser and Marin Cazacu.

    He also studied and worked in various string quartet master classes with members of the Amadeus, Alban Berg, Hagen, Tokyo and Emerson Quartets.

    In 1999 the ConTempo Quartet was offered a Fellowship at the Royal Academy of Music in London, where each member coached chamber music groups.

    In 2003, after an international audition, Adrian and his colleagues from ConTempo became Galways Quartet-in-Residence on the west coast of Ireland, a job sponsored by the National University of Galway, the National TV Channel TG4 & the Arts Council.

    Adrian won many national competitions all over Romania and two prizes in International Cello Competitions in Bucharest and Sofia. As a member of the ConTempo String Quartet he has won a record of 13 international prizes in competitions such as London, Munich, Hamburg, Rome, Graz, Berlin, Bucharest & Prague.

    Adrian has a busy schedule of more than 80 concerts a year and he has performed, on his own or with the ConTempo Quartet, all over the world including Concerts as Soloist with Orchestras in Germany, Italy, Romania, Austria, France, Canada, Bulgaria & UK (where he played concertos by J.Ch.Bach, Ph.E. Bach, Boccherini, Vivaldi, Haydn, Beethoven, Brahms, Lalo, Saint-Saens, Schumann, Tschaikovsky, Dvorak, Elgar, Bernstein, Korngold, Piazzola etc.) and Chamber Music Recitals in Carnegie Hall in NY, Wigmore Hall and St.Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Berliner Philarmoniker, Waterfront in Belfast, Max Joseph Saal in Munich, Theatre Chatelet and Festival Clasique-au-Vert in Paris, Auditorium in Brussels, Gedai University in Tokio, Opera House in Tel-Aviv, Haydn Festival in Eisenstadt, Kings Lynn Festival (where ConTempo played with Londons Royal Philarmonic Orchestra Elgars Introduction and Allegro),Stockholm, National Concert Hall in Dublin, San Marino, Toronto, Madrid, Rome, Lisbon, Vatican, Amsterdam, Graz, Beijing and Bucharest.

    Adrian and his colleagues from ConTempo had the honor to perform for personalities such us the Pope John Paul II, Nelson Mandela, Prince Charles and the EU Ministers.

    As a member of the ConTempo Quartet Adrian recorded for BBC, RTE, Lyric FM, Radio France Musique, TV Mezzo, RAI, ORF, TVR and for the CD Companies: Sonny, Universal, DeutscheSchalplatten, Somm etc.

    ConTempo recorded also the music for Steven Spielberg and Tom Hankss TV Drama Band of Brothers and featured in Bob Quinn's film ConTempo goes West.

    Adrian composed, arranged and recorded the music for the Trop tard movie, who was selected for the Cannes Festival in France,(Director Lucian Pintilie) and for the Dama cu camelii play for the National Theatre in Bucharest (where he was collaborating with the famous actress Maia Morgenstern).

    Collaboration with different artists and musical genres is a very important part of Adrian's musical life. So thats why he is very often seen playing on a baroque cello either early, renaissance or baroque music. He is also keen on jazz, pop, rock, argentinean, Irish & brazilian music where he is playing modern and/or electric cello.
    He was joined in his concerts by well known artists as: Emma Johnson - clarinet, members of Amadeus, Arditti, Casals, Vanbrugh & Balanescu quartets, John O'Conor, Hugh Tinny, Finghinian Collins / piano as well as popular singers such as Julie Feeney, Sinead O'Connor, Tommy Flaming etc.

    Adrian is holding international courses in Ireland (Royal Irish Academy of Music in Dublin, Concorda, ConTempo Summer School in Galway etc.) Romania (Icon Arts Festival), UK & Japan.

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    Jean-Pierre Robert. G. Aperghis, I. Xenakis, Erwan Maheo réal. - 1/2 -

    6:21

    Installation Sonore de JP Robert pour le Centre d'Art de Kerghéhennec. 1997. Vidéo : Erwan Mahéo. Iannis Xenakis : THERAPS pour contrebasse seule dans la criée du port de pêche de Lorient, et, 2 des RECITATIONS de Georges APERGHIS au Château de Kerghéhennec. Sound installation conceived for Art de Kerghéhennec's center. 1997. Realization: ERWAN MEHEO. Iannis Xenakis: Theraps for solo double bass, in the auction of the fishing port of Lorient, and, Georges APERGHIS : 2 recitations, in the Castle of Kerghéhennec.

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    SILBEREN, ROLAND DAHINDEN

    3:38

    composer Roland Dahinden
    for piano and string quartet

    Hildegard Kleeb, piano
    The Arditti Quartet
    Irvine Arditti, violin
    Graeme Jennings, violin
    Dov Scheindlin, viola
    Rohan de Saram, cello

    2004 mode records

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    Roger Sessions: From my Diary

    8:01

    Roger Sessions (1896-1985): From my Diary, per pianoforte (1937-1940).

    1. Poco Adagio
    2. Allegro con brio
    3. Larghissimo e misterioso
    4. Allegro pesante

    Robert Helps, pianoforte.

    Registrazione live alla University of South Florida, Music Recital Hall, a Tampa il 6.2.1997.



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    Conlon Nancarrow: Toccata For Violin and Player Piano

    1:37

    Another great piece of music by the virtuoso, Nancarrow.
    It is quite unsure when the piece was written. It was approximately between 1935-1980.

    I have listen to different artists to have done this song and in my opinion, this was the best sounding one.

    Performed by Arditti Quartet.

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    Martin Loridan - 3 pièces pour quatuor à cordes - Arditti quartet

    4:07

    Martin Loridan - 3 Pièces pour quatuor à cordes (1/3) [w/ score] (2013) - Performed by the Arditti quartet

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    James Clarke Oboe Quintet

    7:41

    Arditti Quartet, Christopher Redgate

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    Raminta Serksnyte Vortex

    1:38

    Raminta Serksnyte. Vortex for solo violin and large ensemble (2004).
    Performed by Irvine Arditti (violin) and Gaida Ensemble, conductor Vykintas Baltakas.

    Program note:
    The main idea of this piece is connected with literal and figurative meanings of the title. The initial sound material -- stepwise motion in scales, spiralling as in a vicious circle, gets more and more dynamic and complicated with every new turn. Finally everything blends into an amorphous mass, sinking and dissolving in the vortex...

    Raminta Šerkšnytė

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    Cara Speme - Robert E. Lee, countertenor

    4:55

    Cara Speme from the opera Giulio Cesare by Handel
    Arnie Tanimoto, viola da gamba
    Anthony Harvey, theorbo
    Claire Smith Bermingham, violin
    Robert E. Lee, countertenor

    Holy Trinity Lutheran NYC - live performance
    Jeremy Gerard, audio and video

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    Alexandra Filonenko Kiefers Schatten für Streichquartett, Satz 2

    7:28

    Alexandra Filonenko Kiefers Schatten für Streichquartett, Satz 2
    Auff: Arditti Quartett

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    Fanfare Soundpainting ⎢ W. Thompson R. Clerc ⎢ 2oo6

    5:43

    - Quelques mots sur la rencontre entre Robert Clerc, compositeur de musique, et Walter Thompson, créateur du « soundpainting » et chef invité, à la direction de l'Orchestre Municipal d'Harmonie de Cluses (Fr), autour des « Chansons à Bouger ».

    « J'ai proposé une collaboration avec l'Orchestre d'Harmonie de Cluses, pour l'enregistrement des musiques de cinq chansons de l'album. Plutôt qu'une interprétation conventionnelle, je voulais tirer parti de toutes les qualités sonores de cet ensemble en particulier et lui écrire une partition sur mesure...

    L'occasion était trop belle d'inviter Walter Thompson(idée soufflée par Federico Benedetti, directeur de l'Harmonie, toujours à l'affût d'un beau projet !) pour préparer et diriger l'Harmonie.

    Un week-end du mois de mars 2oo6, les musiciens de l'Orchestre d'Harmonie et quelques très jeunes élèves de l'Ecole de Musique de Cluses (de 8 à 15 ans) se sont familiarisés au « soundpainting » : technique de direction par un catalogue de gestes, mise au point et perfectionnée depuis près de 30 ans par Walter Thompson : à un geste est associé un son, instrumental ou vocal, une intention musicale, une attitude physique du musicien, etc...

    Walter Thompson s'est ensuite approprié la musique de cinq chansons que j'ai écrite pour la session (orchestrée pour instruments d'Harmonie, partitions rythmiquement et harmoniquement simples), pour mieux la dé-composer, au sens organique du mot et la régurgiter en une nouvelle composition sonore et « sensationelle ». La musique est affaire de sensations !

    L'interprétation de ces chansons ainsi réalisée fut libre, stupéfiante et jouissive et à l'écoute du résultat, nul ne peut dire, du compositeur, du chef d'orchestre ou de chacun des musiciens, qui est l'auteur de cette musique spontanée commune. C'est la petite musique de la vie. » r. c.


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    Elliott Carter: Adagio tenebroso , part 2/2

    8:09

    BBCSO, cond. Oliver Knussen.

    Art by Robert Motherwell.